Sunday, May 08, 2016

Oh, To Be Like Mom

'Tis Mothers Day, causing me to reflect a bit on my Mom. She was an orphan raised by a wealthy timber baron family shortly before the turn of the last century. The family treated her well, but never adopted her. After she finished high school, she was sent to a business school so she would have skills needed to support herself.

She didn't need the the training for long before Dad wooed and won her, but she made outstanding use of her talents throughout her life. She served as leader of her small church congregation for more than 20 years. She was the first woman elected to serve on the community's Board of Education, and the first woman to be chosen board president. Somehow, Mom found time to help promote just about every good cause that came along.

At the same time, Mom made sacrifices large and small to be sure my sister and I valued education and completed college, although helping us through years of higher education put a severe financial strain on the family.

Mom lived well into her eighties. In all the time I knew her, I never heard her say a disparaging word about another human being. She was an over achiever who was calm and cheerful in all she did. Wouldn't the world be wonderful if everyone lived their life that way?

7 comments:

little bug said...

Well said!
She indeed was a great mother and person! You and your sister were lucky to have her as your mother!

Celia said...

Remarkable woman with a truly kind heart!

Tom Sightings said...

Was your mom on one of the orphan trains that brought kids to the upper Midwest from the East Coast? A few months ago I read "Orphan Train" by Christina Baker Kline, an interesting novel based on a real phenomenon that I knew nothing about. Regardless, your mom sounds like a great role model. You were lucky!

Dick Klade said...

No, Tom, my Mom was born in northern Wisconsin. Her father was killed in a logging accident; her mother died soon after of a disease. I always found it interesting that Mom's brother and two sisters were taken in by different families, and, although one eventually moved to Michigan and another to California, they maintained close ties throughout their lifetimes. You're right, I was lucky to have her.

schmidleysscribblins.com said...

A wonderful mother and a wonderful tribute to her. The women in her generation were truly the 'greatest.'

Big John said...

'They don't make 'em like that anymore', mate. Well, perhaps just a few.

joared said...

Your Mom sounds like a strong compassionate, caring lady. Glad she was able to continue contact with her other siblings.