Friday, October 07, 2016

How Do You Feel . . .

When I started this blog ten years ago, I had the misguided notion that it would provide some widespread benefit as younger readers thirsting for knowledge about life eagerly sopped up my accumulated wisdom. I simply forgot a truth about human nature, at least the nature of most Americans.

It is clear that young adults in the U.S. have scant interest in learning from the experiences of fully mature adults (AKA honey, sweetie, old man, granny, etc.). Advertising predominantly portrays the young enjoying life with the product being pushed. Television shows and movies glorify youth and often portray parents and grandparents as silly old people to be circumvented when necessary and ignored when possible.

This seems strange. It is obvious that people learn from experience. One would think, then, that the less experienced among us would want to avoid pitfalls by consulting the most experienced at every opportunity. However, as a teenager and beyond, the older a relative or friend became, the less inclined I was to ask them about anything. I've seen no evidence that things have changed.

Because we all obviously are subjected to the aging process, it also would seem that as they grow older the kids would ask fully mature adults how we feel at various stages of our lives so they would have an idea of what's to come. Yet, I've never had that sort of question put to me by anyone a generation or more younger than I.

Since we geezers are unlikely to be asked to provide serious information, we may as well offer some light-hearted thoughts about how we feel. Most of the time, I feel very good. There's a lot to feel good about. Blogging friend Ramana Rajgopaul provided a look at some of the less important positives with a list defining a "Seenager" a few posts ago. It brightened my day--perhaps it will do the same for you:

5 comments:

Tom Sightings said...

I used to tell my kids that MY parents were old and square and out of it. But THEIR parents were smart and cool and hip. That usually got a smirk and an exaggerated eye roll from them. So, alas, methinks thus it was always so.

Rummuser said...

Thank you. The young are after instant gratification now and that makes us outdated.

PiedType said...

Sad to say I don't recall tapping my parents' years of wisdom either. Somehow it seems we go through life needing to experience and learn things for ourselves, often the hard way. If we ever sit at a parent's or grandparent's knee and say "Tell me about ... ," it's likely just so we can laugh at what the "old days" were like. And because those were the "old days," they can't possibly have any bearing on current days. "Times have changed, ya know." "We don't live in the Stone Age anymore."

Reminds me of the saying, "Youth is wasted on the young."

Anonymous said...

But we don't have all the answers. Just because we've lived longer doesn't always make us experts. The best I can do is listen to my adult children and offer my love and respect for how they handle sitituations.

Dick Klade said...

We surely do not have all the answers. If often tell my son, "I have an answer for every question, but it isn't always the right one."